Runyon Tidbits

2005

Tidbits on this page were originally published online between January and December 2005

Adron Runyon's tombstone at the cemetery next to the Old Pond Primitive Baptist Church.  Adron donated the land for both church and cemetery.

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Ephraim Runyon gets a mention in the story of the Dawles Homestead Farm in East Amwell, N.J.   William and Martha Dawles lived on Ephraim’s homestead.  Martha was Ephraim’s daughter.  That’s all on the Runyon family, but the preceding story is of interest for its description of how cloth is dyed.  In that area, there was a Mr. Van Doren who used iron pots and brass kettles to make dyes to color cloth.  He made yellow from potato leaves and left these instructions on how to extract the dye:  “Cut the tops from the potatoes when in flower; bruise and press them to extract the juice.  Linen or woolen soaked in this luquor 48 hours takes a firm permanent yellow color.  If the cloth is afterwards plunged into blue dye it then becomes a permanent green.  This operation does not injure the potatotes.”  No doubt other plants were used to extract other “liquors.”  Source:  “A History of East Amwell, 1700-1800.” East Amwell Bicentennial Committee.  Ringoes, N.J.  1876.  p.90-91.
 

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The 1793 Militia Census of New Jersey lists a Joseph Runyon and a Joseph Runyan.  The former is listed as number 28 of 100 men in the Winsor Township.  Joseph Runyan is listed as number 1882 in the Hopewell Militia.  Source:  James S. Norton.  “New Jersey in 1793.” 1213 East 2100 South.Salt Lake City, UT.  1973.  p. 174, 229.
 

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A year after the report of gold discovered in California in 1849, 126 men from Wayne County, Ohio, went west to seek their fortune.  Their story is told by Mrs. Elizabeth McCorkle in her article, “Gone to California.”  She was given permission to reprint the names of the Ohio men by the Huntington Library of San Marino, CA.  In this list, there is an Elijah Runyan from Lake Twp., Ashland County, Ohio.  The group left Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, on 8 March 1850 and arrived in California seven months later.  The author notes that the top of the list said  “Taken aboard the steamboat, ‘Consignee.’”  She said this could mean the boat was at a California port or at St. Joseph, MO.  Source:  Elizabeth S. McCorkle.  “Gone to California.”  National Genealogical Society Quarterly.  P. 259-260.
 

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Several mentions of Runyons, Runyans and Runions are found in a compilation of Early Kentucky Records.”  They include these interesting tidbits:

  • William D. Hixon (1828-1909) of Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky, was a historian, teacher, editor of a paper and a librarian.  A drawing of the floor plan of the courthouse at Washington, D.C. was found in his papers.  Among the committee names were Daniel Runion and A. Runion. 

  • In a record under “Minister Marriages, Mason, County, we find Elijah Bell and Susanna Runyon who married 08 December 1800 

  • Under “ Marriages Confirmed by Rev. Gates, Middleton, Jefferson County, Kentucky” were Runyon, Jas. M. who married Charity Johnson on 22 January 1834

  • And under “Madison County, Kentucky Court Records” were Patience Baxter who married Martin Runyon in1799  (Vol.1,  pg 74).

  • Yet under the topic “Bond Boxes”, one finds still another spelling for Runyon, Runyan, Runion in these entries:  Consent-for Patience Baxter to marry Martin Resongon, written by Elizabeth Baxter (her mother), Wittiness (sic):  Green Baxter, George Huffhuter.

  • Finally, under Shaker Records, we note that Charlotte Runyan d. Nov. 1879  age 93 yrs   d. Pleasant Hill, Kentucky.

 

Source:  “Early Kentucky Records,” Kentucky Ancestors Quarterlies: Vol.1,1965 through Vol.5 1970, and Vol.9 1974 through Vol. 10 1974. Copied by Lloyd F. Oliver, 1974.

 

 

  • Between 1769 and 1792, early Kentucky settlers would petition for different civic projects.  Records show that 800 persons, including Henry Runyon, signed Petition No. 60.  The petition asked the state Supreme Court not to hold trials in only one place, but to also meet “at Lexington in the County of Fayette, and other at Baird’s Town in the County of Nelson.”  In June 1788, Joseph Runyon signed Petition No. 58 with other inhabitants of the District of Kentucky, addressing their request to the General Assembly of Virginia.  The signers’ action came after they convened at Danville, Ky., to discuss an act concerning transformation of the District of Kentucky into an independent state.  

(Source:  Robertson, James Rood.  “Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky to the General Assembly of Virginia.”  Louisville, Ky.  John P. Morton and Company.  1914.  p. 121-122, 124.
 

 

  •  John and Elizabeth Marshall issued an indenture on 28 December 1801 to Joseph Runyon.  They all lived in Fayette County, Kentucky.  The indenture was for 15 pounds, 3 acres and 91 poles on the waters of Cane Run.  It was recorded 17 August 1802 on p. 134 of the Deed Book.  On 29 September 1802 Joseph Runyon and his wife Margaret Runyon made an indenture to Vincent Runyon, all of Fayette county.  This one was for 30 pounds, 3 acres and 21 poles on the Cane Run waters.  It was recorded 19 April 1803 on p. 283 of the Deed Book  

(Source:  Cook, Michael L. and Bettie.  “Fayette County Kentucky Records.”  Vol II.  Cook Publishing Company.  Evansville, Ind.  1985.  P. 176-277, 534.

 

 

  • The first tax list for Alexandria Township, Hunterdon County, N.J., was made in 1785 by Mr. Henry Gulick, assessor.  Listed on the tax rolls were Abner Runyan, 243; 4h, 4c (6c); and Stephan Runyan, 145, 2h, 2c.  

(Source:  "New Jersey Rateables.zzzzz'  Vol. 54, May-September, 1979.  p. 58.
 

 

  • There appears to be a relationship between Runions and the immediate family of Daniel Boone, according to the “The Boone Family,” published in 1982.  The immigrant who came to America was George Boone in 1717.  The will of his great-grandson, also named George, states:  “To William Runion & Mary his wife $900.”  This George Boone (William5, George4, George3) was born circa 1759.  He died 30 June 1824 in Pike Township, Berks County, PA.  Mary Boone, his daughter, was born 18 Octoer 1788, and she married William Runion.  

(Source:  Spraker, Hazel A. (compiler).  “The Boone Family, A Genealogical History of the Descendants of George and Mary Boone Who Came to America in 1717.”  Baltimore, MD.  Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.  1982.  p. 102-103.
 

 

  • Private Henry Runien did not have a happy day on 1 June 1779 in Maryland.  On that date, he was discharged for desertion from the Maryland troops in the Continental service.  His existing record does not show his enlistment; it just carries the remark “deserted.”  

(Source:  “Muster Rolls and Other Records of Services of Maryland Troops in the American Revolution.”  Published Under Direction of the Maryland Historical Society.  Baltimore, MD.  Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.  1972.  p. 156.
 

 

  • The Ware family has an interesting history in Todd County, Kentucky.  Edmund Ware married Louisa V. Anderson, both of Todd County.  Two Ware daughters married two Runyon men, but no first names or their relationship, if any, are noted.   The Ware children are recorded simply as:  Sarah J. (Runyon), Charles William, Mary A. (Edmonds), Jasper A., Susan B. (Runyon), Martha G. (Dickinson), Nicholas M. and Louisa E. (Garth).

(Source:  Battle, J.H., editor.  “History of Todd County, Kentucky.”  F.A. Battery Publishing Co.  1884.  p. 335-336.

 

 

  • Gary Runyon, grandson of Robert Runyon, co-author of Runyon Genealogy, found these Runyons in the Union Service Index while searching for records at the Archives in Washington, D.C.

General Index Card Ky.#23 Service Index

Alexander Runnion (Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

John Runnion  (Runian)(Runion)

7th Ky Inf

Pvt.

William Runnion (Rinion)

22 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Hiram Runnyan (Runyon)

18 Ky Inf.

Pvt.

Robert L. Runnyon (Runyon)

3 Ky Inf.

Pvt.

Adam Runon (Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Clay Runyan

2 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Gidian Runyan (middle name D or B)

13 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Harvey Runyan (Runyon)

14 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Hereford Runyan (Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Hiram Runyan

18 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Robert L. Runyan  (Runyon)

3 Ky Inf.

Pvt.

Saulsberry Runyan  (Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Sylvanis Runyan   (Runion)

3 Ky Inf.

Pvt.

Thomas Runyan  ( Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Cpl.

Thomas M. Runyan (Runyon)

2 Ky Inf.

Cpl. Sgt.

Uriah Runyan  (Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Thomas Runyan (Runion)

39 Ky Inf

Cpl.

Calvery  Runyon (Runyons)

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Freeman Runyon (Runyons)

3 Ky Inf

Pvt.

George T. Runyon (Runyons)

21 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Harvey Runyon (Runyons)

14 Ky Inf

Pvt.

John W. Runyon (Runyons)

3 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Silas R. Runyon  (Runyons)

7 Ky Inf

Pvt.

William Runyon (Runyons)

7 Ky Inf

Pvt.

Alfred Runyons

 

39 Ky Inf

Pvt.

 

 

  • Uriah Runyon, born circa 1830, married Sally or Sarah Roberts 8 February 1855.  They lived in Logan County, Va., now West Virginia.  During the Civil War, Uriah enlisted in Co. I, commanded by Capt. Jules M. Kirk, of the 39th Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers Infantry commanded by Col. David Mims on 19 September 1863 at Peach Orchard, Ky.  He mustered in as a private to serve three years, but never completed his enlistment.  In a special issue called the “Heritage of Mingo,” published by The Mingo County Genealogical Society, Williamson, W. Va., author Tom Atkins tells the following tale:

 

“One (raid) involved a skirmish on Pond Creek in Pike County, Kentucky, near the present location of the Magic Mart store.  In that skirmish Uriah Runyon was killed.  Uriah was buried on the little hill there and his remains were later removed to the Apple Orchard Cemetery on the brushy fork of Johns Creek.  Uriah Runyon commanded a Union group.  He was a son of Adam Runyon, Jr., and Martha Harris.  He was a brother of Clay Farley’s wife Polly, of Wolf Creek, a brother of Emmariah Runyon Harmon of Wolf Creek from whom the writer descends.  He was also a brother of Lewis Runyon of Johns Creek.  He was a half-brother to Napoleon B. Slater of Slaters Branch and to Columbia America Slater who married Wallace J. Williamson, founder of the city of Williamson, and to John B. Slater who owned the upper section of West Williamson which included the land where Fairview Cemetery is now located.  Uriah also had a number of half-brothers and –sisters who were children of his father and his father’s second wife, Wealthy Aldridge.”

 

Uriah and Sally Roberts Runyon children were Missouri, born 13 December 1856, and John B. (Bud), born 4 June 1859.  After Uriah’s death, Lewis G. Runyon applied for guardianship of the minor children.  Their names in the record were spelled Runion.  Uriah’s widow, Sally, later married Farmer McCoy on 8 August 1869.

 

 

  • Below is the latest report from the Runyon/Runyan/Runion Y-DNA project at FamilytreeDNA.com.  There are four participants with one awaiting results of a 37-marker test. The analysis indicates close relationships between the three individuals even though they come down from three different ancestors and have three different spellings to their surnames.  In other words, at some point in history the three men share a common ancestor.  The question is when that point in time exists.  The project needs males to participate who have proof that they descend from Vincent Rongnion.  For more information go to www.ftdna.com or to the Runyon project web site.

 

 

  • While we’re on the subject of DNA, the 2 May 2005 online edition of The Wall Street Journal carried an article on efforts between millionaire singer Jimmy Buffett and billionaire financier Warren Buffett to determine if they are related.  Research has shown no indication of a relationship.  However, photographic examinations of some members of the two families show visual resemblances that some persons believe indicate kinship.  The story concludes that both men are considering participating in a DNA test to see if they are related.  The moral of the story for genealogy lovers is that DNA testing will become a valuable shortcut to establishing heritage for many persons even if you have unlimited financial resources as do the two Buffetts.

 

 

  • In archival materials of the land patents issued by the U.S. government for Harmony Township of Clark County, Ohio, Warrant S-7405 showed that 376 acres were awarded to Edward Wills or Wells and John Carroll for service with Virginia military units in the American Revolution or prior service in Indian skirmishes. The patentee of this land (the person to whom the Virginia Land Office actually granted the land) was often not the war veteran.  The archives list the patentee of this warrant as James Galloway, Junior.  Then the archives list the actual settlers on this land.  These individuals, according to the editor of these patents, may be purchasers, lessees or squatters who had occupied the land before the government program started.  This particular warrant has this notation:  “Heirs of T. Hull; H. Rungan? (Runyan? Rungase?) & W. H. Lafferty, 1835.”  A history of Clark County taken from an 1881 book reproduced online shows that there was a Henry Runyan living in Clark County in 1838.  He was proprietor of the first tavern in the county, bought a mercantile business from Herriman Chamberlain when he was made postmaster, and later succeeded Chamberlain as postmaster.  His brother also is the possible settler.  His initials were H.L. Runyan.  Both their biographies are online.  

(Source:  Smith, Clifford N., Federal Land Series, A Calendar of Archival Materials on the Land Patents Issued by the United States Government With Subject, Tract, and Name Index,” Vol. 4 Part 2, American Library Association, Chicago, IL, 1986, pp. VIII, XIII, 28 and 64.
 

 

  • Tom Runyan, a frequent contributor to Tidbits, sends an interesting account of another Henry Runyan taken from a book called “Early White Settlements.”  Henry married Mary Bush of Bourbon County, Ky., sometime after 1784 when he emigrated to Kentucky from his native Virginia.  He secured several warrants of 100 acres each about 14 miles north of the Ohio River on 9 May 1790.  Then in 1792 “or probably the year previous” he built a cabin and cleared the land.  At the time the story of Runyan’s Settlement was printed, Isaac Runyan, Henry and Mary’s son, was still living on the land at the age of 92.  He remembered the old cabin his father had built as well as a school constructed of buckeye logs with benches and greased paper for windows.  He particularly remembered an old textbook titled “Dilworth’s Speller and Reader.”  Religious meetings in the settlement were out in the open as they didn’t have a church.  They made their clothes of linsey-woolsey, which is a coarse, woven fabric of wool and cotton or of wool and linen that pioneers spun at home.  Entertainment in the settlement, Isaac remembered, was log rolling, cabin raisings, wrestling, jumping, pitching quoits and target shooting for the men.  Women enjoyed quilting parties, spinning, apple bees and corn husking.  Both men and women put on little plays and enjoyed dances that included the Virginia reel.  Source:  “Early White Settlements,” pps. 98-100.  Submitted by Thomas Eugene Runyan.
     

 

  • A Runyon, a Runyan and a Runneon are among the names in Volume II of the “Pension Roll of 1835” encompassing the mid-Atlantic states of Delaware, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.  Israel Runyon is listed as having served in the 3rd regiment artillery of Essex County, N.J., and died 29 Sept. 1813; his heirs are listed as Clark and William Runyon.  In Franklin County, Penn., Private George Runyan is listed in the Pennsylvania Continental line and was placed on the pension roll at age 74 beginning 04 April 1818.  And in Greene County, Penn., Private Conrad Runneon, who served in the New Jersey Continental line, began his pension 25 May 1818 at age 82.  

(Source:  “The Pension Roll of 1835, Indexes Edition in Four Volumes,” Vol. II, Genealogical Publishing Co., pps. 26, 653, 659.
 

 

  • Last November, the Farmingdale News Transcript, a newspaper which serves Colts Neck, Englishtown, Farmingdale, Freehold, Howell, Manalapan and Marlboro, N.J., remembered Dr. Peter Field Runyon, a leading citizen of the area who had died 50 years earlier.  Dr. Runyon at the time of his death had been a practicing veterinarian for 42 years.  He was born in Stelton (Piscataway) to Noah Dunham and Mary Jane McCurdy Runyon.  He was a 1912 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.  Dr. Runyon had served as mayor of Freehold Borough from 1926 until 1946.  Prior to that he was a councilman of the city.  

(Source:  Farmingdale News-Transcript online edition. http://newstranscript.gmnews.com/news/2004/1109/Front_page/016.html.  Accessed 09 November 2004.
 

 

  • Lloyd Bockstruck is author of an interesting genealogical column that runs Saturdays in The Dallas Morning News.   In a column titled “French Left Erratic, Interesting Genealogy,” he states that in the latter part of the 19th century, French women retained their maiden name.  Other French adopted a different surname to add to their end of their name, the latter of which has become known as a “dit” name.  Over centuries, the dit name sometimes became the family name.  Mr. Bockstruck also cites a scarce research resource called the Drouin collection as “one of the true treasures of French genealogy in North America.”  This collection is on microfilm at only two locations:  the Allen Public Library in Fort Wayne, Ind., and the Historic Genealogical Society in Boston, Mass.  Mr. Bockstruck notes that because the collection costs $80,000 it may prevent other libraries from acquiring it.  Nonetheless, this kind of research collection may be what holds the key to the links between Franch and the Rongnion, Runyan, Runyon and Runion surnames. Source:  Bockstruck, Lloyd, special contributor, The Dallas Morning News, “French Left Erratic, Interesting Genealogy,” 27 Aug 2004.
     

 

  •  Vincent Runyon and his wife Mary along with several other people conveyed 95 acres of land in Mason County, Ky., to Abraham Golden on Oct. 18, 1819.  A witness to the conveyance was John Runion.  Vincent and Mary Runyon acknowledged the deed in Brown County, Ohio. Source:  Mason County, Ky., Court and Other Records, Deed Book W, p. 276.
     

 

  • Jno. P. Onderdonk, secretary and treasurer of the Union Paper Bag Machine Co. in Philadelphia, Penn., took a sheet of company letterhead on Oct. 3, 1905, and wrote down his lineage.  In beautiful script he noted the following concerning the Onderdonk Family: 

 

 

1620 Andrew, from Holland, 1672

 

his son

 

1650 Andrew Adriane (Adrian written above Andrew) mar. Maria Vander Vleit, Nov. 11th, 1683, m 1687 Jacob J. Vanderbilt

 

his son

 

1684 (with other illegible numbers next to it) Adrian mar. Sarah Snedeken sons _____ both of Flatbush, L.I.

 

his son

 

1715 Isaac mar. Artie Ryerson

 

his son

 

1741 Isaac mar Sarah Smock

 

his son

 

1795 John mar Catherine Cowenhaven (Conover)

 

his son

 

1810 Peter C. mar Mary Runyon

 

Hence—Yours Truly

The lineage closed with the following notation:  “Dan Oliver  This genealogy is I think correct.”

Source:  see illustration


 

 

  • The Runyon/Runyan surname DNA project continues to move forward.  So far there are three participants each spelling his surname different from the other.   You can access the records at http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Runyan-Runyon.  Note that the Runion participant’s YDNA test is not yet available.

 

 

We received good response to last month’s information in Runyon Tidbits about DNA analysis from researchers in pursuit of more information about the Runyon/Runyan surname.   As we discussed last month, DNA analysis is a modern genealogical tool that offers information to help answer whether your family’s use of the Runyon/Runyan or Runion/Runnion name derived from French, Irish or other roots.  But we need more male participants to answer this question.

 

A Runyon surname page is now administered on the www.familytreedna.com website.  So far there are two participants—one who spells his name Runyan and one who spells it Runyon.  Results from one DNA analysis are in, and the Family Tree DNA site is currently running its analysis of the other.  Results soon will be posted on a separate web site.


If you are interested in this research tool, Family Tree DNA offers a special price on families involved in a surname study.  By participating in the Runyon project, you will save $60 over FTDNA’s normal price.  For instance, cost for a 12-marker test runs $99 instead of $159; a 25-marker test runs $169 instead of $229; and a 37-marker test runs $229 instead of $289.   The administrators share in none of these costs; only FTDNA makes money off these tests.

Which test should you take?  The higher the number of markers, the more precise genealogical information is gained.  For instance, once a number of males with the Runyon surname participate, all those with a perfect match of 37 markers gain the assurance that there are a fewer number of generations before a Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA) can be determined.  However, your DNA sample is stored by the FTDNA meaning you can start at the 12 marker, if you wish, and then pay to have more markers tested.

For more information on this project, go to the FTDNA Runyan/Runyon site.  Or sign up for your test here

 

 

  • A column titled ” Off the Record” from the Ashland, Ky., newspaper has a fish story.  In it, Tom Gallagher quoted the story of a “Big Catch” from the News-Press of Fort Myers, Florida.  It seems that Harold Runyon of Catlettsburg, Ky., was vacationing in Fort Myers.  On the boat “Captain Anderson,” which was sailing south of Fort Myers, Runyon and other fishermen reeled in109 pounds of red and black grouper. The heaviest one weighed 12 pounds. 

(Source:  Clipping from Ashland, Kentucky, newspaper,30 December 1962, p.16.)
 

  • In James Fennimore Cooper’s book, “The Pioneers,” the Rev. Daniel Nash, an actual Episcopal priest whose parishioners called Father Nash, was portrayed as Parson Grant.  Father Nash’s church headquarters in the 18th and 19th centuries was in Butternuts, Otsego County, N.Y. In his church records, titled “Father Nash’s Records of Baptisms,” he is listed as having chrstened two Runnions.  They were :

o    William Runnion son of Henry and Martha Runnion, born 09 March 1797 and baptized on 30 November 1797.

o    Betsy Runnion, daughter of John and Anna Runnion,born 03 January 1814 and baptized 31 July 1814

(Source:  “New England Historical and Genealogical Register”,Vol.CXV, April 1961, pages 15 and 110.)                   

 

 

  • In marriages officiated at the Pond Creek Baptist church in Pike County, Ky., several Runyons are listed.  Adron Runyon (1801-1859) donated the land for the church, the old “Pond Creek Primitive Baptist Church”.  He also donated the land across the street from the church, which is on a hill, for the cemetery.  He is buried there along with other Runyons including, Amos and his wife.  Amos Runyon was co-author of Runyon Genealogy. Adron Runyon was the son of John and Elizabeth (Runner) Runyon and grandson of Isaac and Charity (Geertje Hageman) Runyon. The cemetery does reveal names of outstanding progenitors of Pike County families.  The church marriage list was compiled by Judith Manley and Stephen Trout officiated in these weddings: 
     

 

Aaron Runyon
Polly Runyon              
Arminda Runyon         
Nancy Runyon             
Adrian Runyon              
Charity Runyan                 Maises? Runyans                

 

 

Married
Married
Married
Married
Married
Married
Married

 

Rebecca Farley
Anderson Hatfield
Lawyer T. Lowe
Wm. C. May
Elizabeth Pursan?
Thomas Steff
Eliza E. Bevins

15 March 1866
02 August 1855
25 January 1855
01 May 1856
11 October 1866
26 October 1865
15 October 1867

 

Sources:  “Old Pond Hatfield/McCoy Historical Association,” Tug Valley Genealogical Society, Newsletter, Fall/Winter 1999 Vol. 2, No.2, O.T.Atkins, editor, South Williamson, Ky., p.14 and “Pond Creek Baptist Church," Pike County, 62 Marriages Performed by Stephen Trout, Minister, compiled by Judith Manley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The front of the Pond Creek Primitive Baptist Church in Pike County, Kentucky.